Psychedelic Drugs In Therapy

Psychedelic Drugs In Therapy

Introduction
There are several psychedelic drugs that are being studied to determine if they have any promising medical possibilities. D-lysergic acid (LSD), ibogaine, and methylenedioxy methamphetamine (MDMA) are among those drugs. LSD has shown potential for treating drug and alcohol addictions and cancer patients. MDMA has shown promise when used in conjunction with psychotherapy. These drugs, although promising, have serious side effects that may outweigh their benefit. More studies still need to be done before these drugs are legalized for use in medical and therapeutic situations.
Medical Possibilities for LSD and Other Psychedelic Drugs
The National Institute on Drug Abuse funds some studies to determine if psychedelic drugs have any medical possibilities. Scientists at the Orenda Institute in Baltimore are examining LSD as a possible treatment for addiction to heroin, opium, alcohol, and sedative hypnotics. Researchers at the University of Miami are studying ibogaine, another similar psychedelic drug, as a potential treatment for cocaine addiction. Other scientists are focusing their psychedelic research on studying and learning more about the human brain, relieving pain in cancer patients, and discovering antidotes to drug overdoses (Kurtzweil, 1995).
Early research suggested promising potential for psychedelic drugs when used to treat

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