Hazing

Hazing

Is It Innocent Team Bonding Or
The Abuse and Endangerment of An Athlete?s Rights
Current issues have forced NCAA athletics to deal and confront the dangerous acts of team hazing. On January 14th, the University of Vermont men?s hockey season was forced to a sudden halt. With thirteen games left, the team?s 23 remaining players were read a litany of their sins by the state?s attorney general, William Sorrell. He stated the schools handling of the hazing incident(s) was ?conducted loosely while specific evidence was withheld that lead to a slow indecisive investigation,? which resulted in his intervention (Hoover).
Hazing is a long practiced and in many cases long accepted rite of initiation in such cliques as military and college fraternities and athletics. It is a relatively new current issue and needs to be seriously addressed. Last August Alfred (NY) University released a study that included two hundred and twenty four participating institutions that submitted names and addresses of 61,258 student athletes. From the responses, they found that 80% of responding college athletes were subjected to alcohol-related hazing and more than 20% to such other activities. Of the participating institutions, the UVM was not one

hazing, athletes, team, activities, should, one, initiation, take, percent, time, subjected, rules, respondents, questionable, people, must, athletics, alcohol, university, study, students, student, reported, problem, prevention, part, major, know, hoover, games, done, dangerous, coaches, both, bonding