1994 Baseball Strike

1994 Baseball Strike

On August 12, 1994 professional baseball players went on strike for the eighth time in the sports? history. Since 1972, negotiations between the union and owners over contract terms has led to major economic problems and the absence of a World Series in 1994.
All issues were open for debate due to the expiration of the last contract. Until 1968, no collective bargaining agreement had ever been reached between the owners and the players (Dolan 11). Collective bargaining is the process by which union representatives for employees in a bargaining unit negotiate employment conditions for the entire bargaining unit (Atlantic Unbound). Instead, the players were at the mercy of each owner who possessed the exclusive right, at the close of each season, to resign each player on his roster. If the owner chose to renew a players contract, that player had the option of agreeing to those terms or not playing baseball. As a result of the obvious imbalance in the labor situation, the players attempted on several occasions to organize a union. Although this process may seem like a simple one, baseball has proven that it can be very difficult. The players have been represented by various unions in

owners, players, strike, union, labor, teams, salary, baseball, end, agreement, 1994, tax, season, revenue, new, years, player, million, major, bargaining, parties, owners?, cap, between, because, settlement, review, payroll, over, negotiations, monthly, market, free, contract, after, 1995